Last edited by Bagami
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

5 edition of The obese patient found in the catalog.

The obese patient

by George A. Bray

  • 37 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Saunders in Philadelphia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Obesity.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies and index.

    StatementGeorge A. Bray.
    SeriesMajor problems in internal medicine ; v. 9
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC628 .B653
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 450 p. :
    Number of Pages450
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5198149M
    ISBN 100721619312
    LC Control Number75020798

    Obesity is a common, serious, and costly disease. The prevalence of obesity was % in ~ [Read CDC National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) data brief]From – through –, the prevalence of obesity increased from % to %, and the prevalence of severe obesity increased from % to %.   Much of the data described earlier are based on anesthesia studies and studies of the otherwise healthy obese patient, while few studies have been done assessing the obese patient in the ICU. Thus, critical care of obese patients is an area ripe for .

    Amongst patients included, the overall rate of recurrent VTE out to 1 year was events/patient year, and the only event during the entire follow-up occurred off therapy. Throughout the year, % were prescribed a DOAC only, % were prescribed traditional therapy only and % were switched from LMWH/warfarin to a DOAC.   Obesity is an increasingly pervasive health problem, and caring for hospitalized obese patients presents a wide array of issues for nurses. Effective care of obese patients requires careful consideration and planning, from simple tasks such as taking blood pressure or transferring to a stretcher to complex emergent situations such as airway compromise.

    Obesity has deleterious effects on the skin. Common conditions found in obese patients include intertriginous dermatitis, acanthosis nigricans, hyperkeratosis, pressure injuries, and erythrasma. The causes and management of these disorders vary, but one constant in the care of obese patients is the need for regular skin inspection.   The report found 63 per cent of patients receiving intensive care in UK hospitals after contracting the coronavirus are overweight, obese or morbidly obese. Almost 40% were under


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The obese patient by George A. Bray Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Treatment of the Obese Patient, a well-referenced book, is a detailed review of the various systems that regulate eating behavior and body weight.

It includes discussions of neurobiology, gut peptides, adipokines, and ectopic fat. In summary, this book provides new tools for immediate application in clinical practice."Cited by: Product details Paperback: pages Publisher: Matrix Medical Communications; 1 edition (J ) Language: English ISBN ISBN Product Dimensions: 7 x x inches Shipping Weight: ounces Customer /5(3).

From the book reviews: “This update of a book on the clinical management of obese patients incorporates some of the recent discoveries and medical therapies. The purpose is to address the physiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of cturer: Springer. Treatment of the Seriously Obese Patient by Thomas A.

Wadden (Editor), Theodore B. Vanitallie (Editor) out of 5 stars 1 rating. ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book 4/5(1). This book is the first to describe a practical evidence-based approach to the management of critically ill obese patients with various medical or postoperative respiratory problems in the intensive care : Hardcover.

Treatment of the Obese Patient is a timely and informative text for all health care providers challenged with helping patients manage weight. This. This chapter discusses the challenges present during surgery for the obese patient.

Obese patients should ideally be operated on early in the day to allow adequate immediate postoperative time during daylight hours to detect and treat any complications which arise. This book provides health professionals with sound clinical advice on management of the obese patient admitted into hospital.

It addresses all aspects of the patient's care, as well as serving as a resource to facilitate the management of services, use of clinical information, and negotiation of ethical issues that occur in intensive care.

The first edition of this book and its companion volume, Handbook of Obesity: Etiology and Pathophysiology, Second Edition, was published as Handbook of Obesity, edited by George A. Bray, Claude Bouchard, and W.

James (Marcel Dekker, Inc., ). Because almost 30% of patients who are obese have eating disorders, screen for these in the history. The possibility of bingeing, purging, lack of satiety, food-seeking behavior, night-eating syndrome, and other abnormal feeding habits must be identified because management of these habits is crucial to the success of any weight-management program.

Nurses’ attitudes towards obese patients: a review of the literature 16 January, Obesity is a public health challenge and a source of discrimination for individuals; nurses can help to tackle it by providing patient-centred, non-judgemental care.

The annual number of weight loss operations performed in the United States in the early s totaled only ab, but by the figure exceededThe anesthetic care of severely obese patients entails particular issues, and difficulties are believed.

The use of high-flow nasal O2during pre-oxygenation and then continued during apnea can also prevent hypoxia before and during intubation attempts by extending SAP6. In another study, obese patients (BMI 30–40 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to routine pre-oxygenation or pre-oxygenation plus “buccal” oxygenation.

This volume brings together an array of leading experts to discuss the causes and consequences of obesity today and present a comprehensive framework for treatment. The Handbook provides readily applicable guid elines for assessing an individual's need for weight reduction and pla nning appropriate interventions, based on the most current theoretical and empirical work in the field.4/5(4).

Continued research in these and other settings such as home health care and emergency response, and with obese and morbidly obese (“bariatric”) patients is research-based evidence gathered thus far has led to the development of safe patient handling standards, and ongoing legislation to enact laws requiring or promoting the use.

Clinical Challenges in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring: Special Populations, Physiological Conditions and Pharmacogenomics focuses on critical issues in therapeutic drug monitoring including special requirements of therapeutic drug monitoring important to special populations (infants and children, pregnant women, elderly patients, and obese.

This is a superb book for primary care clinicians and specialists who routinely care for overweight and obese patients. This well-researched, well-written book covers the worldwide obesity crisis with many practical applications for primary care clinicians to use to counsel their patients and help them choose an informed treatment strategy.

There is strong and consistent evidence from randomized trials that overweight and obese patients in well-designed programs can achieve a weight loss of as much as 10 percent of baseline weight.

In the diet trials, an average of 8 percent of baseline weight was lost. Weight should be measured by digital scales or a beam balance to the nearest g. Equipment should be calibrated regularly by standard weights (4×10 kg and 8×10 kg), and the results of test weighing recorded in a book.

Patients should ideally be weighed in light clothing and bare feet, ideally fasting and with an empty bladder. bladder. Downright refusal to treat obese patients is the most extreme form of bias. But even if a patient with obesity is seen by the doctor, there are lots of subtle negative messages.

Medical offices may be ill prepared in terms of equipment: scales that can't weigh patients over pounds; blood pressure cuffs and examination gowns that don't fit; waiting room furniture and imaging machines that.

In conclusion, the role of a nurse in managing an obese patient should involve discussing the weight issues and the severity on the patient’s health. As supported by Green et al () this will enable the nurse to gain insight into the magnitude of the problem and to negotiate realistic goals in terms of weight loss and to support and.The mean age of participants ranged from 41 to 62 years (where reported).

The proportion of women ranged from 3 to %. Mean baseline BMI ranged from to kg/m The estimated total motivational interviewing time provided during the intervention ranged from 50 to by:   Introduction.

Obesity is a global healthcare problem that has risen to epidemic proportions worldwide [1, 2].It is now common to admit obese medical or surgical patients to the intensive care unit (ICU) [].It is estimated that at least 20% of patients admitted to the ICU are obese [4, 5].One of the main challenges of the critical care management of obese patients is successful respiratory.