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Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Costly pollution abatement, competitiveness, and plant location decisions found in the catalog.

Costly pollution abatement, competitiveness, and plant location decisions

James R. Markusen

Costly pollution abatement, competitiveness, and plant location decisions

by James R. Markusen

  • 387 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Environmental policy -- Economic aspects.,
  • Industrial location -- Environmental aspects.,
  • Competition -- Environmental aspects.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJames R. Markusen.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 5490, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 5490.
    ContributionsNational Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination26 p., :
    Number of Pages26
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22413792M

    Location theory has become an integral part of economic geography, regional science, and spatial on theory addresses questions of what economic activities are located where and why. Location theory or microeconomic theory generally assumes that agents act in their own self-interest. Firms thus choose locations that maximize their profits and individuals choose locations that. The marginal cost of meeting the abatement goal is relatively low for the inefficient firm but may be extremely expensive for the plant that was already operating efficiently. For common resources, such as fish and wildlife, government will set harvest limits and issue a limited number of licenses that specify what can be caught and in what.

      For instance, a location is more desirable if it entails high productivity and lower costs of transporting automobiles from the manufacturing plant to General Motors’ dealerships. Thus, GM’s operations management is involved in cost-optimization for a limited number of facilities for this strategic decision . to the literature, as most existing research relies on measures of pollution abatement cost that may be endogenous to plant location decisions. We find that ignoring agglomeration externalities masks the pollution haven effect in the chemical industry. The paper is structured as follows. The next section reviews the literature on FDI and.

      New research shows that importing goods from low-wage countries has helped US manufacturers shift production to less-polluting industries, produce less waste and spend less on pollution control. Dasgupta, Hettige, and Wheeler () and Dasgupta, Laplante, and Mamingi () present econometric results suggesting that capital markets influence plants’ pollution abatement decisions. Dasgupta, Hettige, and Wheeler () find that publicly traded Mexican firms are more likely to adopt environmental management practices, implying that.


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Costly pollution abatement, competitiveness, and plant location decisions by James R. Markusen Download PDF EPUB FB2

ELSEVIER Resource and Energy Economics 19 () RESOURCE and ENERGY ECONOMICS Costly pollution abatement, competitiveness and plant location decisions James R. Markusen Department of Economics, Competitiveness of Colorado BouMer, CO USA National Bureau of Economic Research Abstract The NAFTA debate included assertions that were used as Cited by: Get this from a library.

Costly pollution abatement, competitiveness, and plant location decisions. [James R Markusen; National Bureau of Economic Research.]. Costly Pollution Abatement, Competitiveness, and Plant Location Decisions James R. Markusen. NBER Working Paper No.

Issued in March NBER Program(s):International Trade and Investment The US-Mexico free-trade debate included some theoretical assertions that were then used as arguments against trade and investment by: Costly pollution abatement, competitiveness, and plant location decisions.

[James R Markusen; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- The US-Mexico free-trade debate included some theoretical assertions that were then used as arguments against trade and investment liberalization.

(1) Trade liberalization increases the degree to. Downloadable. The US-Mexico free-trade debate included some theoretical assertions that were then used as arguments against trade and investment liberalization.

(1) Trade liberalization increases the degree to which production is internationally relocated in response to environmental restrictions (`environmental dumping'?). (2) Investment liberalization, leading to multinational firms. I find that: (1) Trade liberalization increases production sensitivity to costly environmental restrictions, but arguments against liberal trade on welfare grounds do not follow.

(2) Multinationals do not increase the production-reallocation effect caused by environmental restrictions or by: " Costly pollution abatement, competitiveness, and plant location decisions," Discussion Papers, Series IIUniversity of Konstanz, Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) "Internationalization of the Economy".

James R. Markusen, Location of Repository Costly pollution abatement, competitiveness, and plant location decisions. By James R. Markusen.

Get PDF (1 MB) Abstract. This quote contains two separate policy suggestions: (1) Trade barriers insulate production and welfare from any adverse responses to costly environmental restrictions. Trade barriers insulate.

Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link). The pollution haven hypothesis, which is based on trade theory, predicts that more stringent environmental policies will increase compliance costs and, over time, shift pollution-intensive production toward low abatement cost regions, creating pollution havens and causing policy-induced pollution leakage (e.g., Levinson and Taylor, ).

This. Grossman and Krueger (), for example, have examined whether pollution abatement costs influenced the patterns of the U.S.

bilateral trade and investment with Mexico and found that "the. More recently, a substantial body of work examined industry-specific effects of environmental regulation on the productivity of pollution-intensive firms most likely to face pollution control costs, as well as on plant location and employment decisions within firms.

Facility location determination is a business critical strategic decision. There are several factors, which determine the location of facility among them competition, cost and corresponding associated effects.

Facility location is a scientific process utilizing various techniques. Location Selection Factors. If the firm is required to pay $ for the additional external costs of pollution each time it produces a refrigerator, production becomes more costly and the entire supply curve shifts up by $ As illustrated in the fourth column of Table 2 and in Figure 1, the firm will need to receive a price of $ per refrigerator and produce a.

The location decisions of goods-producing firms will generally pay more attention to parking, access, and traffic counts than will service location decisions false Location decisions of goods-producing companies often assume that costs are relatively constant for a given area; therefore, the revenue function is critical.

Pollution is an example of a negative externality. If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website. If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains * and * are unblocked.

Emissions trading (also known as cap and trade, emissions trading scheme or ETS) is a market-based approach to controlling pollution by providing economic incentives for reducing the emissions of pollutants.

A central authority (usually a governmental body) allocates or sells a limited number of permits that allow a discharge of a specific quantity of a specific pollutant over a set time period.

ADVERTISEMENTS: The leading factors affecting plant location are as follows: 1. Selection of Region 2. Township Selection 3. Question of Urban and Rural Area 4.

Location of a Factory in a Big City 5. Location of an Industry in Small Town 6. The Sub-urban Location for a Factory 7. Site Selection 8. Current Trends in [ ]. Chapter 55 - Environmental Pollution Control ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION CONTROL AND PREVENTION.

Jerry Spiegel and Lucien Y. Maystre. Over the course of the twentieth century, growing recognition of the environmental and public health impacts associated with anthropogenic activities (discussed in the chapter Environmental Health Hazards) has prompted the development and.

"Benefit-Cost Analysis of U.S. Regulations Affecting Surface Water Quality." Charles W. Griffiths and William Wheeler in Cost-Benefit Analysis and Water Resources Management. Brouwer and David Pearce. Edward Elgar Publishing, "A Change of PACE: A Comparison of the and Pollution Abatement Costs and Expenditures Survey.".

For instance, companies selling pollution-control services, whether they be consultants, environmental lawyers, or businesses making water filters, find that tougher standards bring in more customers.The cost of pollution abatement to fall.

decisions to use more resources in the public sector will mean fewer resources for the _____ sector. A market _____ occurs when the competitive market system produces externalities- a situation where not all the benefits or costs.

Thus, the long run cost is constructed from information on the short run cost curves. The firm in its decision-making wishes to first minimize costs for a given output given its plant size and then minimize costs over plant sizes.

In the diagram below the relationship between average and marginal costs for four different firm sizes is illustrated.